Sarah Barker of Deadspin.com has written an article on doping in Triathlon with some quotes by Joel - 

Why does the triathlon, an Olympic event since 2000 that combines swimming, cycling, and running, appear to be so clean?

A quick search of “triathlon” in mainstream publications like USA Today or the Wall Street Journal returns not a single story, not even a hint, about performance enhancing drugs. The same cannot be said of track, swimming, or cycling, where you don’t have to be an insider to get the impression that many top-level performances are PED-assisted. Those sports have had enough revelations of widespread doping, bribery, and coverups that most breakthrough performances are suspect.
“We just haven’t had a scandal recently with the power to blow up the issue,” Filliol said via Skype from his home base in Glasgow, Scotland. “So, we’re speculating, like we always do, but it would be naive to assume otherwise. That’s where sport is right now. As far as why we [in triathlon] don’t have more positive tests, it’s the same with all sports. From top to bottom in the anti-doping movement, there are incentives not to find [athletes doping] because it looks bad for the sport.”
— deadspin.com

Read the full article on Deadspin.com for more quotes and perspective on the issue of doping in Triathlon 

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AuthorJoel Filliol

This week Joel is on the Physio Matters podcast with Jack Chews and Paul Westwood

Session 32 – Simply Elite Triathlon with Joel Filliol and Paul Westwood

The ‘Olympic Special’ with Paul Westwood and Joel Filliol of JFT Racing Triathlon team! Huge privilege to chat to Joel and Paul ahead of the Rio Games about whether simplicity can be applied effective to elite triathlon.

|Subscribe on iTunes|

Source: http://chewshealth.co.uk/the-physio-matter...
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AuthorJoel Filliol
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AuthorJoel Filliol
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AuthorJoel Filliol

The presentations from the ITU Science and Triathlon Conference are now available free to view including my talk on Simon Whitfield's career:

"Canadian Simon Whitfield had an extra-ordinary career, spanning four Olympiads from Sydney 2000 where he was triathlon’s inaugural Gold Medalist, to 11th in Athens and then back to the podium with the Silver medal in Beijing 2008, and finally to London 2012. This presentation will examine the consistency of Whitfield’s career from his junior performances to his two Olympic Medals, spanning 8 years between them. With contributions from Whitfield himself, direct observation from Filliol as his personal coach from 2005-2008, and with contributions from coaches and training partners throughout Whitfield’s career, factors which contributed to these performances will be explored including training and preparation trends, health and injury patterns, environmental factors, lifestyle and supporting factors, as well as psychological factors."

Watch the other talks from the conference here on Daily Motion

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AuthorJoel Filliol

Triathlon Physiotherapist Paul Westwood shares his current thoughts are on the development of a model of best practice when it comes to Team & Athlete health:

  1. Don't pander to athletes pain/issues explain and reassure instead. Therefore possible mal adaptive behaviour is not rewarded and reinforced.
  2. Similarly limit the use of adjuncts / passive intervention (tape, ice, acupuncture, electro) anything that promotes the belief that 'this is something serious / more of a problem than it actually is'.
  3. Avoid the nocebo effect; athletes must believe that there is nothing inherently wrong with their bodies / ability.
  4. Therefore athletes become less sensitive / more resilient / more capable. This is spread throughout the team with athletes learning 'healthy pain behaviour' rather than mal adaptive behaviour. 
  5. Once this culture is engendered an issue or expression of pain from an athlete can be taken more seriously as a sign of overloading / injury.
  6. By keeping the coaching / support staff to the limit of necessity and limiting the amount of 'shareholders' in the team allows this culture to be sustained.
  7. Progressive load management and therefore injury / over load prevention can be achieved from the coaching/support staff through consistent training and the layering effect of training over days, weeks, months, years. Athlete monitoring should be done on a daily basis regarding mood, behaviour, performance etc. "

Follow Paul on twitter 

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AuthorJoel Filliol

Check out this interview I did with Jason Bailey of Nature Gym:

Excerpt:

NG: With 2016 being an Olympic year, there is no doubt a lot of pressure on the athletes to perform or to simply qualify. How much pressure do the coaches feel, particularly private coaches such as yourself?

JF: I don’t look at the Olympic year differently than other years.

Every year is important to avoid making errors, every year is important for athletes to improve and make progress, every year we have big goals to work towards. It’s not productive to focus on the Olympic games as the only goal, or to judge your career by only these standards. Building to an Olympic Games is a nice goal to be motivated by, and there is a process to arrive at the start line ready to perform, but it’s not really different than other opportunities to perform despite the importance some people place on the event. For our athletes we have multiple performance objectives every year, and the World Series and Grand Final are always one for the top level, and developing athletes have many different outlets to prepare towards.

Read the full interview here

Source: http://thenaturegym.blogspot.com.es/2016/0...
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AuthorJoel Filliol

 Brian D. Earp (@briandavidearp) has written this timely article on bull shit in science. This has been a frequent topic in my work and was discussed on the Real Coaching Podcast

This is why the job of the coach to filter the BS is so important to be effective.

It’s about a methodology for investigation, which includes, at its core, a relentless drive towards questioning that which came before. You can both “love science,” he concludes, “and question it.

if you love science, you had better question it, and question it well, so it can live up to its potential.
There is a veritable truckload of bullshit in science.¹ When I say bullshit, I mean arguments, data, publications, or even the official policies of scientific organizations that give every impression of being perfectly reasonable — of being well-supported by the highest quality of evidence, and so forth — but which don’t hold up when you scrutinize the details. Bullshit has the veneer of truth-like plausibility. It looks good. It sounds right. But when you get right down to it, it stinks.
The amount of energy necessary to refute bullshit is an order of magnitude bigger than to produce it.” This is the unbearable asymmetry of bullshit I mentioned in my title, and it poses a serious problem for research integrity. Developing a strategy for overcoming it, I suggest, should be a top priority for publication ethics.
Source: http://blogs.bmj.com/medical-ethics/2016/0...
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AuthorJoel Filliol
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AuthorJoel Filliol

Jason Hettler of Hettler Performance has written a nice blog on the art and science of coaching, a topic that always creates debate and discussion on Art vs Science, when of course coaching is a continual process of testing and evaluating hypotheses, so it's not either or by any means.

The following quote nicely sums up my view on art and science in coaching:

That being said, coaching is more than its individual parts – the sciences. It is the fluid, dynamic and ever-evolving interplay of these parts that create the whole. A whole which cannot be reduced to one element just as a cloud cannot be reduced to one particle. The art comes from blending these sciences into working with inherently individual athletes and maneuvering through any and all obstacles that will arise on a daily basis. The art comes from experience.
Source: http://www.hettlerperformance.com/?p=123
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AuthorJoel Filliol
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AuthorJoel Filliol

Dr. Marco Cardinale has an interesting blog on the intersection of coaching and sport science, based on his experiences first as coach, then as a sports scientist. Here are some highlights:

I still see enormous improvisation in the coaching community, with far too many people not having a programme and a structured approach to assessing what works and what does not work. There is still a lot of improvisation in too many places. Coaches turn up and do something, completely unstructured, with not much clarity and knowledge over the implications of their sessions and unclear ideas about progressions. In many cases, I see coaches picking “sessions” in random order and with limited control over loading.
Coaches should be great at coaching and teaching as well as creating positive environments for athletes to improve.
My advice to you working as a coach, as a strength and conditioning specialist or as an “ologist” with athletes at any level is to avoid the “Nessie Phenomenon” and try to critically analyse any information coming your way. Do not accept what you hear or what others tell you. Go and find the information, try things yourself, try to assess what works and what not, document your experiences, reflect. Only in this way you will be able to separate the wheat from the chaff.
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AuthorJoel Filliol

This is adapted from an analysis of British Swimming post 2012 from a senior US coach who compiled the following top ten recommendations from leading peers. It's not exhaustive but is applicable to all Olympic sports:

1. Abandon early selections for all but confirmed medal contenders.

2. Race in tough international competitions far more often. (French Grand Prix, German Bundesliga)

3. Hire a Head Coach from your country. Make your own people responsible for performance.

4. Feed an 'us against the world' culture.

5. Get the CEO and HPD out of the way, so the best coaches can be themselves and work in a way they have demonstrated gets results. 

6. Facing the worlds best should be your only focus.

7. Hold fewer national team camps and make them more specific in a competitive environment.

8. Focus on the athletes who succeed.

9. Put your athletes in situations where they are not well paid, not well housed, not comfortable. Those will fire in their belly will rise. Same with coaches.

10. Reward top performance, not effort, at the end of the journey. Some will fail. Tough.

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AuthorJoel Filliol